Since the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and our partners launched Go Austin! ¡Vamos Austin! (GAVA) in 2012, we’ve seen incredible changes in two communities. Our goal was to engage a cross-section of the community in coordinated childhood obesity prevention, and to find the sweet spot where local engagement meets evidence-based best practice. Well, we’re getting there.
Next steps in the movement towards better health
Since the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and our partners launched Go Austin! ¡Vamos Austin! (GAVA) in 2012, we’ve seen incredible changes in two communities. Our goal was to engage a cross-section of the community in coordinated childhood obesity prevention, and to find the sweet spot where local engagement meets evidence-based best practice. Well, we’re getting there.
Improving the health of our youngest generation: This is the issue Marathon Kids, an Austin-grown nonprofit, has been tackling for the last 20 years. By promoting daily exercise, along with a healthy and nutritious diet, the organization works to boost confidence and health by putting younger generations on the path to a lifetime of fitness.
Marathon Kids: Scaling nationally so more kids can go the distance
Improving the health of our youngest generation: This is the issue Marathon Kids, an Austin-grown nonprofit, has been tackling for the last 20 years. By promoting daily exercise, along with a healthy and nutritious diet, the organization works to boost confidence and health by putting younger generations on the path to a lifetime of fitness.
Late last week news broke that food and beverage companies sold 6.4 trillion fewer calories in the United States in 2012 in comparison to 2007. A decrease in calories is a positive step, and while the number did exceed industry goals, it begs the question: why do we need to slash calories in the first place?
Processed food, sugar and a plea for common sense
Late last week news broke that food and beverage companies sold 6.4 trillion fewer calories in the United States in 2012 in comparison to 2007. A decrease in calories is a positive step, and while the number did exceed industry goals, it begs the question: why do we need to slash calories in the first place?